Tag Archives: Australia

Supporters of Carbon Tax Australia

Action group GetUp reported on supporters of carbon tax Australia who joined a rally in Melbourne, Australia, mid-March where 8,000 supporters of the carbon tax Australia initiative demonstrated agreement with Julia Gillard’s government on the introduction of a carbon tax.

Check out the video showing supporters of carbon tax Australia to see what happened that Saturday and learn how your support can continue to win the fight for a price on pollution.

The 8,000 crowd supporters of carbon tax Australia was in response to and far outweighed, the 1,500 person crowd where representatives of the major energy companies joined an anti-carbon tax rally outside Parliament House, Canberra, to (according to GetUp) “convince polititians that they should be able to pollute for free and avoid responsibility for our kids’ future.”

Join supporters of carbon tax Australia.

 

 

 

Passive Solar Homes Design Creates 300,000 New Jobs

Designs of passive solar homes, incorporating advances in recycling building materials from demolition, water and waste water design should be the focus of progress in our search for answers to reduce our domestic energy consumption.  New advances in solar water heating, grid connected photovoltaic systems and the integration of other renewable energy systems should be incorporated  into the built environment.

Passive Solar Homes to Create Opportunities

Solar Passive House Image - solar Umbrella

Passive Solar Homes with Solar Umbrella

Passive solar homes, adapted to become energy and water efficient such as this house shown with a solar umbrella, could create 300,000 new jobs in the building industry – this growth would take place over 20 years and be in key industry areas.

The growth in new jobs will only take place if we are serious about reducing greenhouse gas emissions and introducing policies and practices to ensure we only construct and reconstruct energy and water efficient homes.

Australia’s built environment constitutes 33 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions and this figure increases to 40 per cent when infrastructure and embodied energy are taken into account.

These amounts could  be reduced if energy consumed in existing homes is reduced by between 30 and 50 per cent and by 80 per cent in all new homes. This is why passive solar homes are the only realistic solution to our residential built environment energy problems.  However not all designers and architects specialise in energy efficient design and a ‘near enough is good enough’ attitude will not bring the best results in reducing energy consumption. Contact passive solar homes specialists for the best advice and outcome and ask them for proof of their expertise before you enter any contracts.

Retro-Fitting Existing Homes

Of the 7.5 million houses in Australia we know most need to be retrofitted to become more  energy and water efficient. Many of these will eventually need to be replaced with new state-of-the-art passive solar homes because it will be too costly to retrofit them.

Homes to be demolished will have to be carefully recycled and this will entail the introduction of procedures and policies to ensure wastage is kept to a minimum.

Building Codes Needed For Recycling Existing Homes

National building codes and other relevant legislation in Australia do not require home owners and builders to comply with energy and water efficiency principles when demolishing, retrofitting or renovating homes.
Legislation is lagging and up until now lay people and industry groups have led the way in the instigation of innovative and necessary change.

The idea of adapting a home to become more energy and water efficient is normally decided by home owners, who place pressure on designers and builders to trial new methods.

Once these techniques have been found to be effective, builders adopt them into mainstream practice and political parties follow by introducing them into legislation.

This means the general public and industry professionals will continue to lead the way in the push for important change, but this may not be enough if we are to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions to mitigate the impact of climate change.

Demand For Passive Solar Homes

Many people in Australia want to live in passive solar homes and work in buildings that have been designed and built to comply with energy efficient and climate sensible principles.

While it’s good news people that people  want to live in energy efficient homes, there are barriers to these lifestyle changes which include money, industry know-how and legislative amendments. This is because the cost to retrofit a property may initially be outside a home owner’s budget despite the investment eventually being offset in energy savings while also reducing each of the occupants’ carbon footprints.

Legislation Lags Consumer Demands

Industry know-how and current legislation are also not at the level desired by consumers.   In the interim, young people, tradespeople, homes designers and architects could extend their skills’ levels by enrolling in sustainability courses  and placing pressure on landlords and employers to implement climate sensible and energy efficient principles in the rental market and the workplace.

However retrofitting and building new passive solar homes by home owners is probably the most likely and definitely the most effective response to our domestic over-consumption of energy.

 

Image: Courtesy Wikipedia

Solar Energy Optimism

The main message from the recent Australian Solar Energy Society ['AuSES'] 2010 Conference in Canberra, Australia, was very optimistic about the widespread use of solar energy in all its forms.

Having been involved with International Solar Energy Society ['ISES']  since 1979, through the West Australian branch and then the Australia & New Zealand Solar Energy Society ["ANZSES'] as an incorporated body, when it came into being in 1984, one could understand my optimism to see something I have passionately believed in as the most sustainable way forward for mankind, has started to become a reality.

No longer will the use of solar energy in all its forms be considered a fringe, “thing of future” any more.   I have written a series of articles that distil my perceptions of the proceedings from a professional standpoint and the political implications of holding this landmark conference in our nation’s capital, Canberra.

Solar Energy - Watts installed

Graph: showing the explosion of installed PV in Australia in the last decade

The way forward from hereon is the encouragement of more focused research in the various fields of endeavour in the diverse world of solar energy applications.

AuSES is destined to have a pivotal role in the next 50 years to ensure that planet earth no longer lives on the edge of energy and environmental uncertainty.

A series of articles that covers what happened in Canberra will be published on solar-e over the next month or so.

Garry Baverstock AM, CEO of www.solar-e.com

2010 President of AuSES, WA

The following aspects will be discussed in articles posted from December 2010 onwards:

- The Week that Canberra Became a National Focus for AuSES in 2010

- The Role of the Built Environment in Using Solar Energy and Addressing Climate Change – A Viable Direction for AuSES

- Political Will and Systems Thinking for Climate Change Needed – How AuSES Can Help

- Nuclear Politics a Real Danger for Progress of Solar and Renewable Energy Progress – Collaboration Needed Not War

- Open Learning and Presentation of Facts – the Key for Greater Use of Solar Energy – AuSES Leading the Way

- New Solar-e.com Will Soon be Ranking Solar Societies and Associations Conference Papers – First Step AuSES

- The List of  ‘solar-e’ Best Papers at Solar 2010 – AuSES Conference in Canberra

Valuable solar-e links:

An Introduction

Events

Solar Power

Eco-Development

Philosophy

Self Realisation & Ethics

Cancun Climate Change Targets

Solar-e.com is a member of and supports the work of The Sustainable Energy Association of Australia  (‘SEA”).

SEA is a chamber for all enterprises from all industries supporting sustainable energy and the fastest growing energy industry body in Australia.  SEA is bringing you the Energising South East Asia Conference 23-26 March 2011, Perth, Australia.

View SEA’s  recent press release on Cancun.

Climate Change Minister Greg Combet in Cancun is reported to have said that the credibility of the UN process is in danger if progress is not made.

“It is imperative for the credibility of this process that we’re able to make progress here at this conference,” Minister Combet said.

The Sustainable Energy Association of Australia (SEA) is keen to see how Australia might indeed contribute to the credibility of the process.
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